• October 30th 2017

    New Release: The Rats in the Bulkheads

    For this year’s ECTOCOMP, I’ve written a short horror story about the rats, the human mind, and some of the many ways to die in space.

    You can get it right now from Itch.io.

  • May 30th 2017

    Attempted: Building a general-purpose QBN system

    The term quality-based narrative (QBN) refers to a way of building interactive fiction most familiar from Failbetter Games' Fallen London, as well as other games built on their now-defunct StoryNexus platform. Voyageur is also built on this model. Earlier this year, I worked on trying to build a general-purpose QBN tool, working off of the Voyageur codebase, but I didn't get very far; this is basically a list of issues I encountered, as a sort of caution to people thinking of implementing those kinds of systems.

  • May 6th 2017

    Towards a Theory of Parserless Parser Interfaces

    With the release of Vorple for Glulx, now is a great time to think about what I'm calling parseless parser games: Text games that use the world model and mechanical tradition of parser games, but don't actually have a parser interface. The most prominent recent example would be Robin Johnson's Detectiveland.

    This is sort of a theoretical exploration of how to build interfaces to interact with the traditional parser world model (rooms, point of view character, and of course "medium-sized dry goods" as interactive objects). Most of this involves looking at the history of graphical adventure games, which diverged pretty directly from parser interfaces and into point-and-click ones. I'm trying to produce a taxonomy of how those interfaces operate and what their pros and cons are, for people who are looking at building on Vorple to produce extensions or games that use this sort of interaction.

  • May 5th 2017

    Astonishingly Rapid Game Prototyping with Inform 7

    Emily Short recently wrote a post about what reasons there are for writing a parser game in AD 2017. In the comments, I added:

    For me there’s another reason to make parser games, and specifically for using Inform 7: It’s a fantastic platform for experimental games. if I just have an idea that I want to explore or play around with, as long as it’s narrative and turn-based, I’m very likely to reach for I7 as a tool.

    Using I7 cuts away 90% of the boilerplate labor associated with game development: You don’t have to think about or make UI (it’s text input), UX (it’s bad), assets (there are none). You write almost no boilerplate code; everything you write is doing work in defining mechanics, narrative, or environment. I really think more game designers should learn I7 because of its value in that role; even if the thing you make using it isn’t the final form of what you’re making. The 0 to 60 on it is just incredible compared to any other engine or game development tool.

    Inform 7, if you're unfamiliar, is a system for writing parser interactive fiction that uses a purpose-built domain-specific language that somewhat resembles natural English. It's probably my favourite game development environment to work on, for a lot of reasons.

  • April 30th 2017

    A Don't Mind My Apocalypse Head Postmortem; or: Designing a Parser Game Around Specific Interaction, Multiple Endings, and Protagonist Interiority

    March's patreon project, Don't Mind my Apocalypse Head, was a short parser game written around a fairly disturbing dream I had. If you haven't played it, it's fairly short and I suggest you check it out before reading on.

  • April 3rd 2017

    New Release: Don't Mind My Apocalypse Head

    March’s Patreon project is out now for everybody on https://bonsequitur.itch.io/dont-mind-my-apocalypse-head. It’s a horror story about awkward social situations, extra appendages, and the recurring end of the world.

    Thanks to all my Patreon supporters! If you want to help me keep doing this (and get early access to projects along with source code), the Patreon page is this way.

  • February 18th 2017

    Help me write more IF!

    In 2017, with the release of Voyageur, I want to get back to splitting my time between different projects. And, in particular, I want to do more noncommercial work: more short free IF, more reviews and criticism of noncommercial IF, more games writing that doesn’t find a home in commercial outlets, and more altgame experiments like Storytelling Skeletons.

    I also want to be able to dedicate time to improving and maintaining the various open-source projects I’ve released over the last two years. All of these are things that I’m happy to release for free, but which do take up time and energy like anything else. So I’m experimentally launching a patreon; with only a few supporters, I’d be able to put more time and resources towards making those kinds of experiments, and that would mean being able to make more of them.

    Pledges or helping spread the word are deeply appreciated.

  • February 10th 2017

    Voyageur is out now!

    Voyageur, the game I’ve been working on for the past year, has now launched. Read more about it at its website, or you can get it from Google Play or the App Store.

  • January 11th 2017

    New Release: Storytelling Skeletons

    A little side-project for the Pico-8. Wander an endless graveyards, find dark warnings about daunting perils, and never encounter any of them.

  • December 31st 2016

    New release: Not All Things Make It Across

    A follow-up to last year’s The World Turned Upside Down, Not All Things Make It Across commemorates the end of 2016 with another short vignette set in the Mere Anarchy universe. Taking advantage of the threshold of the new year, choose what debris of the past you want to destroy… or keep.

    I hope you all enjoy it. Happy new year, and thanks.

    You can play it on the web, or download the blorb for Z-Code interpreters.